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IYT - Bareboat and Flotilla Skipper 

Course Syllabus

This is a certificate of competency for candidates who wish to command a vessel up to 24 metres in length, in daylight hours, in fair weather and in sight of land, (approx 20 miles offshore).

The “depth of knowledge” required for the theory portion of the International Flotilla Skipper Certificate is the same as required for the International Bareboat Skipper Certificate. Candidates must have logged over 200 miles and 10 days at sea by the end of the course in order to obtain the International Bareboat Skipper Certificate of Competency.

Prior Experience

  • For International Flotilla Skipper: No prerequisite experience required for this certificate.
  • For International Bareboat Skipper: To have logged a total of 200 nautical miles and 10 days at sea by completion of the course. Therefore, the course will suit those with approx 100 miles and 5 days experience. E.g. those who have done a flotilla holiday in the past as first mate or acting crew member.

License renewal

The IYT certificate/license is valid for 5 years. After this time, you will need to renew your subscription to the IYT which is approx $80. And any supporting documentation, if applicable.

 

1.1 Certificate Limitations

  • Command of a vessel up to a maximum length of 78 ft /24 metres
  • In coastal waters up to 20 miles offshore
  • In daylight hours and in fair conditions with moderate wind and sea conditions
  • It is the level of competence required when chartering a boat in the Mediterranean or West Indies where there are restrictions in terms of cruising area and distance from the base and the vessel has to be safely moored in a marina or anchored before dark 
 

1.2 Scope

The scope of this 5 to 6-day course is for the student to obtain the theory and practical knowledge required to safely and competently operate as skipper/captain with full understanding and application of:

  • From International Flotilla-Bareboat Skipper notes/course: small powerboats and rigid inflatable boats, boat handling under power, sails and sail handling, basic meteorology, short passages including heavy weather, restricted visibility & negotiating harbour entrances, compasses and magnetism, charts, chartwork & basic navigation, tides & currents, buoyage, collision regulations, navigation lights, basic first aid and responsibilities of the skipper/captain.
  • From International Crew notes/course: Candidate would have already had prior learning from International Crew consisting of nautical terminology, safety, vessel checkout, basic rope work, refuelling, man-overboard procedures, capsizing, swamping, sinking, anchors & anchoring, running aground and the responsibilities of the crew. 
 

1.3 Objective

The objective of the course is for the student to develop the knowledge and skill sets to competently command a vessel up to 24 metres in length with knowledge described in the

scope section of this framework for both International Crew and International Flotilla- Bareboat Skipper.

 

1.4 Entry Standard

  • The Candidate should be 16 years of age or over and preferably hold the IYT International Crew Certificate or equivalent.
  • For Flotilla Skipper – no previous experience required but prior theory knowledge highly recommended...
  • For Bareboat Skipper - The candidate must have logged over 200 nautical miles & 10 days at sea by end of course.
 

1.5 Certificate and/or Documentation

Either International Flotilla Skipper or International Bareboat Skipper - To be issued after successful completion of all the modules of “International Crew”, “VHF Radio Operations” (or hold a VHF certificate) and “International Flotilla-Bareboat Skipper” have been completed.

 

1.6 Maximum Class Size

Candidate/Instructor Ratio: 5 to 1 for the onboard practical. 16:1 when teaching shore based theory modules.

 

1.7 Specific Staff Requirements

Instructors must be appropriately qualified to IYT standards and requirements.

 

1.8 Teaching Facilities and Equipment

Facility:
  • Approved by IYT
  • IYT Partner School’s classrooms (where applicable)
  • IYT Partner School’s vessels
Course Equipment:
  • As needed and if part of the course is covered ashore:
  • PowerPoint projector and computer
  • Television and VCR
  • Whiteboard or blackboard
  • Charts
  • Nautical publications 
  • Ropes/lines, cleats
  • Vessel with all necessary and working equipment – up to 24 meters in length – suitable for overnight with saloon, galley, staterooms, head and beds for all candidates and instructor.
 

1.9 Teaching Aids:

Visual Aids:
  • IYT PowerPoint presentation
  • Local Slides and videos if available
Textbook(s):
  • IYT Textbook
Reference Books:
  • Admiralty or local versions of the following:
  • Sailing Directions
  • Tide Tables
  • Tidal Stream Atlases
  • International Code of Signals
  • List of Radio Signals
  • List of Lights
  • Notices to Mariners
  • Nautical Almanac
  • Navigational Tables
  • Mariners Hand Book
Teaching Timetable

The modules for the International Flotilla-Bareboat Skipper course should be taught using the “International Boating & Sailing Passport” as the teaching plan. The school can be flexible in the order the material is delivered, however, the entire syllabus MUST be covered and the candidates assessed to the Depth of Knowledge outlined below.

 

1.10 Examination /Assessment Policy

A written examination will be given on the last day of the course. There are several exams available to use at your discretion. We would recommend any failing candidates retake the exam using a different one from the initial exam.

A grade of 75% or higher is required for a pass.

Regarding time allowed for examinations, generally, the expectation would be no more than one hour, however, we allow schools to determine reasonable time using good judgement.

There is no formal practical assessment for the Flotilla-Bareboat Skipper Course, however, a practical assessment checklist is provided by IYT and should be completed throughout the course by the instructor/assessor, however, this is not mandatory.

Candidates should meet the minimum competencies defined in the Depth of Knowledge section below.

Re-Testing Policy

Where a candidate fails an examination, that candidate will be allowed to retake the theory and practical examination after further experience and training. 

 

1.11 Syllabus

Introduction

Objectives of the module

 

Module 13 – Small Powerboats & Rigid Inflatable Boats (RIBs)

Types of ribs, advantages & disadvantages of each, inboard motors, jet drives, outboard motors, steering & propellers, ventilation and cavitation, pre-launch procedures, engine starting & stopping, fault finding, stability & handling, beaching, dinghy equipment, trailer launch, trailer recovery, launching procedures, emergency crash stops, towing.

 

Module 14 – Boat Handling Under Power

Effects of wind, tide and current, coming alongside, arrival at dock, departure from dock, clearing wharf or dock, multiple engines, traveling at speed (planning), high speed turns, heavy weather operations, engine failure, single engine handling, picking up mooring buoy.

 

Module 15 – Basic Sails and Sailing

How sails work, parts of the rigging, points of sail and sailing terms, use of winches, types of sails, roller reefing, slab reefing, basic slab reefing steps, sail materials and construction.

 

Module 16 – Basic Meteorology

Sources of weather information, weather patterns, air masses, monitoring the forecast, fronts, sea breeze, land breeze, katabatic winds, anabatic winds, the Beaufort wind scale, cloud types, hurricanes, typhoons, cyclones, precipitation, fog types, how fog is dissipated, thunderstorms, lightning, after a storm.

 

Module 17 – Short Passages (Heavy Weather, Restricted Visibility & Negotiating Harbour Entrances)

Leeshore, Line squalls, heavy weather tactics, sea anchors & drogues, ice and ice accretion, action in restricted visibility, negotiating a harbour entrance, collision regulations on passage, preparing a short passage plan (reference materials, passage plan headings, what tactics to use, selecting an anchorage, navigation on short passages, delegation of responsibilities to crew).

 

Module 18 – Compasses and Magnetism

The magnetic compass, lubber line, compass error, variation, deviation and applying error, compass bearings, magnetic north, applying variation, magnetic anomalies, hand bearing compass.

 

Module 19 – Charts, Chartwork & Basic Navigation

Chart publications, chartwork instruments, charts, chartwork symbols and abbreviations, scale, heights & depths, cautions & warnings, north/compass rose, tidal diamonds, chart information, soundings, cautions, colours & levels, latitude and longitude, course/distance, course to steer, leeway, heading, speed, set, drift, speed made good, tides, currents, effects of wind, tide & current, dead reckoning, line of position, fixes, compass bearings, planning a fix, running fix, estimated position

 

Module 20 – Tides & Currents

Tides, tidal definitions and tidal heights, chart datum, charted depth, drying height, duration, height of tide, high water, low water, lowest astronomical tide, mean high water, mean lower low water, spring tides, neap tides, range, primary/secondary ports, rule of twelfths, currents, tidal atlas and tidal diamonds.

 

Module 21 – Buoyage

Lateral system, IALA regions A & B, Marks common to both IALA A & B, Isolated danger marks, safe water mark, special mark, wreck buoy, cardinal buoyage system, flashing sequences.

 

Module 22 – Collision Regulations

Definitions, COLREGS, what you need to know, COLREGS part A, COLREGS part B – steering and sailing rules, COLREGS part C – lights and shapes, COLREGS part D – sounds.

 

Module 23 – Navigation Lights

Safe operation in restricted visibility, navigating at night.

 

Module 24 – Basic First Aid

Hypothermia and cold water immersion, causes of hypothermia, cold water shock, rescuing a person with hypothermia, surviving cold water, the “huddle” position, heat escape lessening position, contents of a basic first aid kit, cuts, stings & burns, control of bleeding, shock, dangers of heat and cold, heat stroke, heart attacks, and strokes, unconscious victim, urgency (PAN PAN), drowning, choking, seasickness, heat stroke & exhaustion, carbon monoxide poisoning.

 

Module 25 – Responsibilities of the Skipper/Captain

Skipper or Captain – what is the difference, responsibilities, prior to departure, common courtesy, delegation to crew, duty of care relevant to visitors and passengers, actions to be taken after collision.

International Flotilla-Bareboat Skipper Final Assessment

 

Module 26 – Canadian Boating Requirements (Included in the Canadian Version of International Flotilla-Bareboat Skipper Course for Canadians to complete in lieu of a PCOC – Pleasure Craft Operators Card)

Age-horsepower restrictions, Criminal Code of Canada, boating & alcohol, compliance notice, construction requirements, Canadian Compliance and Plates / Labels, Hull ID number, Pleasure Craft Notice, vessel registration, boat ownership transfer, PWC requirement, compliance notices, types of vessels, boat safety equipment, before setting out, hazards to navigation, licensing, registration and identification markings, equipment requirements for pleasure craft, protecting the marine environment, safe passage thru locks and canals, markers and buoys, standard day beacons, travelling to the U.S. visibility of lights- Canadian modification. 

 

1.12 Depth of Knowledge

One of 4 levels of Depth of Knowledge will be required for every subject within each training level, these levels are Introductory, Outline, Working and Complete, and the level for each is defined below:

Introductory

The material is introduced to the candidate without the knowledge having to be retained. The candidate is shown how to carry out certain tasks or exercises and is made aware of the correct and safe way of carrying these out.

Outline

The candidate will need to demonstrate an outline knowledge of the syllabus and should be able to carry out basic tasks in a correct and safe manner with some supervision.

Working

The candidate will need to demonstrate a working knowledge of the syllabus and be able to carry out tasks without prompting, in a correct and safe manner.

Complete

The candidate will need to demonstrate a thorough and complete knowledge of the syllabus and be able to carry out all the tasks without prompting or hesitation in a safe and correct manner.

Competency Requirements

The material is introduced to the candidate from the syllabus outlined above, and;

The candidate is shown how to carry out the tasks and exercises covered in the Module and is made aware of the correct and safe way of carrying these out. The candidates should be aware of their limitations.

 

Module 13 – Small Powerboats and Rigid Inflatable Boats (RIBS)

Theory and Practical components

The candidate (where applicable) is required to demonstrate theoretical knowledge and practical ability under supervision:

Types of boats, advantages and disadvantages, inboard motors, jet drives, outboard motors, steering & propellers, ventilation and cavitation, pre-launch procedures, feeling, engine

starting and stopping, pre-start checks, staring the motor, fault finding, dinghy stability and handling, beaching, dinghy equipment, trailer launch, launching procedures, emergency/crash stops, towing procedures, bridle towing.

 

Module 14 – Boat Handling under Power

Theory and Practical components

The candidate (where applicable) is required to demonstrate theoretical knowledge and practical ability under supervision:

The effects of wind, tide and current, coming alongside, clearing a wharf or dock, use of multiple engines, vessels handling skills, high speed turns, heavy weather operations, engine failure, single-engine handling, picking up a mooring buoy.

 

Module 15 –Basic Sails and Sailing

Theory and Practical components

The candidate (where applicable) is required to demonstrate theoretical knowledge and practical ability under supervision:

How sails work, parts of the rigging-standing and running, points of sail and sailing terms, use of winches, types of sails, sail handling, sail material and construction.

 

Module 16 –Basic Meteorology

Theory components

The candidate is required to demonstrate theoretical knowledge of:

The sources of weather information, weather patterns, monitoring the forecast, sea breezes, land breezes, katabatic winds, anabatic winds, the Beaufort wind scale, cloud types and formations, hurricanes, typhoons and cyclones, precipitation, types of fog, thunderstorms and lightning, after a storm

 

Module 17 –Short Passages-Heavy Weather, Restricted Visibility & Negotiating Harbour Entrances

Theory components

The candidate is required to demonstrate theoretical knowledge of:

Heavy weather preparations, leeshore, line squall, heavy weather tactics, sea anchors, drogues, ice and ice accretion, action in restricted visibility, fog, negotiating a harbour entrance, collision regulations on passage, preparing a passage plan, selecting an anchorage, navigation on short passages, , delegations of responsibilities of crew.

 

Module 18 – Compasses and Magnetism

Theory components

The candidate is required to demonstrate theoretical knowledge of:

Compass types and their uses, the magnetic compass, lubber line, compass error, variation, deviation and magnetic anomalies, applying error, courses-true and magnetic, magnetic north, hand-bearing compasses. 

 

Module 19 – Charts, Chart Work and Basic Navigation

Theory components

The candidate is required to demonstrate theoretical knowledge of:

Chart publications, chart manufacturers and suppliers, chart work instruments, symbols and abbreviations, terminology and definitions, navigational techniques, estimated positions (EP), running fixes.

 

Module 20 – Tides and Currents

Theory components

The candidate is required to demonstrate theoretical knowledge of:

Tides, causes of tides and currents, tidal definitions and tidal heights, tidal diamonds, tidal atlas, currents

 

Module 21 – Buoyage

Theory components

The candidate is required to demonstrate theoretical knowledge of:

IALA regions A & B, isolated danger marks, safe watermarks, special marks, wreck buoys, the cardinal buoyage system

 

Module 22 – Collision Regulations

Theory components

The candidate is required to demonstrate theoretical knowledge of:

Definitions, general rules, steering and sailing rules, restricted visibility, vessels in sight of one another, lights and shapes, sidelights and stern lights, vessels at anchor, navigating at night, day shapes, sounds and sound signals.

 

Module 23 – Navigation Lights

Theory components

The candidate is required to demonstrate theoretical knowledge of:

Safe operation in restricted visibility, navigating at night, rules for different boat sizes, Rule 23, Rule 25, Rule 30

 

Module 24 – Basic First Aid

Theory components

The candidate is required to demonstrate theoretical knowledge of:

Hypothermia and cold water immersion, cold water shock, rescuing a person with hypothermia, the huddle position, heat escape lessening position (HELP), contents of 1st aid kit, cuts, stings and burns, control of bleeding, shock and shock treatment, dangers of heat and cold, heart attacks and strokes, unconscious victim/not breathing, radio for help, Pan Pan urgency call, drowning, choking, seasickness, heat stroke, exhaustion, carbon monoxide poisoning, CO2 detection

 

Module 25 – Responsibilities of the Skipper/Captain

Theory components

The candidate is required to demonstrate theoretical knowledge of:

Responsibilities of the skipper, prior to departure, common courtesy, delegation to crew, duty of care, duty to visitors and guests, actions after a collision.

 

Module 26 – Canadian Boating Requirements (Included in the Canadian Edition of Bareboat Skipper Course)

Theory components

The candidate is required to demonstrate theoretical knowledge of:

Age-horsepower restrictions, Criminal Code of Canada, boating & alcohol, compliance notice, construction requirements, Canadian Compliance and Plates / Labels, Hull ID number, Pleasure Craft Notice, vessel registration, boat ownership transfer, PWC requirement, compliance notices, types of vessels, boat safety equipment, before setting out, hazards to navigation, licensing, registration and identification markings, equipment requirements for pleasure craft, protecting the marine environment, safe passage thru locks and canals, markers and buoys, standard day beacons, travelling to the U.S. visibility of lights- Canadian modification

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